Keywords

Quantum rods, nano rods, metal detection, chromate, fluorescence

Abstract

Hexavalent chromium is an extremely carcinogenic chemical that has been widely produced in the United States. This has led to major waste contamination and pollution throughout the country. According to the Environmental Working Group Hexavalent chromium has been found in 89% of city tap water. Most people believe they are safe using regular home filter systems however that is not true. A more expensive ion exchange water treatment unit is required. Therefore to protect yourselves from this carcinogenic metal a reliable test is required. In this study we have developed a Zinc Sulfide Manganese doped Quantum Rod technology to detect for presence of chromate and other harmful transitional metals in drinking water. Quantum Rods were synthesized using a hydrothermal reaction method. They were fully characterized using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectric Spectroscopy (XPS) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Quantum Rod metal detection studies were done with 28 different ions in a 96-well fluorescent plate reader. Results show that highest sensitivity to 8 ions including the toxic ions of chromate and mercury allowing us to create a sensor to detect these items.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2014

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Santra, Swadeshmukul

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Graduate Studies

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Degree Program

Interdisciplinary Studies

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005268

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005268

Language

English

Release Date

May 2015

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Graduate Studies; Graduate Studies -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2015; it will then be open access.

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