Abstract

Evolution on Earth is widely considered to be an effectively endless process. Though this phenomenon of open-ended evolution (OEE) has been a topic of interest in the artificial life community since its beginnings, the field still lacks an empirically validated theory of what exactly is necessary to reproduce the phenomenon in general (including in domains quite unlike Earth). This dissertation (1) enumerates a set of conditions hypothesized to be necessary for OEE in addition to (2) introducing an artificial life world called Chromaria that incorporates each of the hypothesized necessary conditions. It then (3) describes a set of experiments with Chromaria designed to empirically validate the hypothesized necessary conditions. Thus, this dissertation describes the first scientific endeavor to systematically test an OEE framework in an alife world and thereby make progress towards solving an open question not just for evolutionary computation and artificial life, but for science in general.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Stanley, Kenneth

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Computer Science

Degree Program

Computer Science

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007167

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007247

Language

English

Release Date

August 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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