Abstract

This study investigated the minority carrier properties of wide and narrow bandgap semiconductors. Included specifically are wide bandgap materials GaN and β-Ga2O3, and narrow bandgap InAs/GaSb type-II strain-layer superlattice. The importance of minority carrier behavior in bipolar device performance is utmost because it is the limiting component in current conduction. The techniques used to determine minority carrier properties include electron beam induced current (EBIC) and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. The CL spectroscopy is complemented with time-resolved CL (TRCL) for direct measurement of carrier radiative recombination lifetime. The minority carrier properties and effect of high energy radiation is explored. The GaN TRCL results suggested an activation energy effecting carrier lifetime of about 90 meV which is related to nitrogen vacancies. The effects of 60Co gamma radiation are demonstrated and related to the effects of electron injection in GaN-based devices. The effects of various high energy radiations upon Si-doped β-Ga2O3 minority carrier diffusion length and radiative lifetime are measured. The non-irradiated sample thermal activation energies found for minority carrier diffusion length were 40.9 meV, related to shallow Si-donors in the material. The CL results demonstrate that the bandgap of 4.9 eV is slightly indirect. The thermal activation energy decreased on 1.5 MeV electron irradiation but increased for 10 MeV proton irradiation. The increase in energy was related to higher order defects and their complexes, and influenced recombination lifetime significantly. Finally, the diffusion length is reported for narrow bandgap InAs/GaSb superlattice structure and the effect of 60Co gamma radiation is demonstrated. In general, the defects introduced by high energy radiations decreased minority carrier diffusion length, except for 60Co gamma on AlGaN/GaN HEMT devices and high-temperature proton irradiated β-Ga2O3.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Flitsiyan, Elena

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Physics

Degree Program

Physics

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007209

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007217

Language

English

Release Date

August 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Included in

Physics Commons

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