Abstract

Ducts with turbulence-promoting ribs are common in heat transfer applications. This study uses a recent modal extraction technique called Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) to determine mode shapes of the spatially and temporally complex flowfield inside a ribbed duct. One subject missing from current literature is a method of directly linking a mode to a certain engineering quantity of interest. Presented is a generalized methodology for producing such a link utilizing the data from the DMD analysis. Theory suggests exciting the modes which are identified may cause the flow to change in such a way to promote the quantity of interest, in this case, heat transfer. This theory is tested by contouring the walls of the duct by the extracted mode shapes. The test procedure is taken from an industrial perspective. An initial, unmodified geometry provides a baseline for comparison to later contoured models. The initial case is run as a steady-state Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes model. Large-Eddy Simulation generates the necessary data for the DMD analysis. Several mode shapes extracted from the flow are applied to the duct walls and run again in the RANS model, then compared to the baseline, and their relative performance examined.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Kapat, Jayanta

Degree

Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering (M.S.A.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Aerospace Engineering; Thermofluid Aerodynamic Systems

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007328

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007328

Language

English

Release Date

December 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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