Abstract

Consumption of fossil and bio-derived fuels is growing due to energy demands associated with increase in population and standard of living across the globe. Power generation and transportation sectors are the primary two sources of fuel consumption, which have raised the demand for crude oil and led to serious environmental pollution issues. This demand for energy forced various government agencies to strengthen the allowable exhaust pollutant concentration limits. Recently, CO, CO2, particulate matter, and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission restrictions have become more stringent to the extent that engines must operate at higher energy densities and efficiencies. Towards this goal, this doctoral study focused on evaluating advanced ignition systems and testing new biofuels for automotive combustion applications. First, a natural gas lean combustion mode was assessed by using advance ignition systems to provide higher brake power while maintaining the exhaust limits. A rigorous combustion data analysis was performed to identify the main reasons leading to improved performance in the case of prechamber equipped laser ignition. An overall efficiency improvement of 2.1% points was observed, compared to spark ignition, which in turn leads to save 633 PJ per year. In the second part of this dissertation, a spherical chamber was designed and validated to measure the laminar burning velocity (LBV) of a promising biofuel: 2,4-Dimethyl-3-pentanone, (DIPK), for homogenous charge compression ignition engines. LBV measurements were carried out with various diluent species (N2, Ar, and He) in order to provide several data points for development and validation of DIPK chemical kinetic mechanisms. It has been found that DIPK does not only have higher temperature and pressure sensitivities (compared to iso-octane), but additionally enabled a faster laminar burning velocity which leads to higher rate of heat release in reciprocating engines.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Vasu Sumathi, Subith

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Mechanical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007387

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007387

Language

English

Release Date

November 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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