Abstract

An unusual protein found in squids, termed reflectin, possesses the unique ability for optical reflectivity and proton conductivity. Reflectin has the potential to become optically and electronically tunable, however, the molecular structure of reflectin has yet to be determined. Previous literature has considered using reflectin proteins as diffraction gratings, protonic transistors, and substrates for neural stem cell growth. Applying recombinant protein techniques, we purified the reflectin 4Ax4 protein. We determined the leucine, tryptophan, and threonine amino acids are in an ordered state by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Knowing these ordered amino acids is possibly the key to understanding reflectin's natural optical and electrical properties. Understanding the link between reflectin's structure and electrical properties is essential to make the next generation of bioelectronic materials based on inexpensive, natural resources.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Chen, Bo

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Physics

Degree Program

Physics

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007433

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007433

Language

English

Release Date

May 2024

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

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