Abstract

Adhesive forces play a significant role on airless bodies due to their weak gravities. Investigating adhesion at the surface of asteroids and their constituent components is vital to understanding their formation and evolution. Previous research has been done to understand the interaction of micron-sized spheres to planar surfaces and sphere-to-sphere interactions, which have been used to develop models of asteroid surfaces. Our investigation experimentally investigates adhesion through atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements between JSC-1 simulant particles and several AFM tips, including a typical pyramidal gold tip and microspheres of sizes 2 μm and 15 μm. The samples of JSC-1 consist of three size ranges: < 45 μm, 75-125 μm, and 125-250 μm. For each sample we looked at the magnitude and distribution of the measured adhesive forces. Results show that the pyramidal tip produced larger forces than the spherical tips generally, and the sample that produced larger forces and a larger distribution of those force was the smaller, more powder-like sample with sizes < 45 μm.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu.

Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Dove, Adrienne

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Physics

Degree Program

Physics; Planetary Sciences

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007755

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007755

Language

English

Release Date

June 2019

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Share

COinS