Keywords

Branding (Marketing), Consumers' preferences, Corporate associations, corporate ability, corporate social responsiblity

Abstract

Termed corporate associations, consumer corporate brand perceptions influence evaluations of new products made by consumers. Corporate associations are conceptualized as falling within two categories (Brown and Dacin 1997): a corporation may develop a reputation for Corporate Ability (CA) by developing quality products or for Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) through its corporate commitment to societal obligations. Past research suggests that product-related CA associations lead to more favorable product evaluations than CSR, which is a contextual association that is less product-related. However, past research has been limited to line extensions, which are evaluated in a piecemeal cognitive process. Unlike line extensions, evaluations of brand extensions include an intervening categorization process that determines consumers' evaluative strategies. This research merges the corporate association and brand extension literature streams and, in four studies, contributes to the literature by establishing that brand extension fit moderates the influence of corporate associations on product evaluations. This finding is developed further by demonstrating that both individual differences (self-construal) and brand-related attributes moderate this interaction.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2011

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Ganesh, Jaishankar

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Business Administration

Department

Marketing

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004015

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004015

Language

English

Release Date

August 2011

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Included in

Marketing Commons

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