Abstract

Emerging fields such as "Organs on a Chip", disease modeling in vitro, stem cell manufacturing and wearable bioelectronics are demanding rapid development of 3D Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) for electrical interfacing with biological constructs. The work reported in this thesis focuses on two developmental tracks: "Dynamic 3D MEAs" and metal microfabrication for 3D MEAs. In the first part of the thesis, we explore the capabilities and limitations of 3D printed microserpentines (µserpentines) and utilize these structures to develop dynamic 3D microelectrodes. Analytical modeling of µserpentines flexibility followed by integration into a flexible Kapton® package and PDMS insulation are demonstrated. These 3D MEAs were further characterized in dynamic impedance measurement experiments and with an artificial skin model demonstrating their potential for wearable bioelectronics. In the second part of the thesis, microfabrication of the 3D metal MEAs for in vitro cell constructs is reported. These were fabricated using laser micromachining in 2D and transitioned out-of-plane to the final 3D conformation by a custom fabricated Hypodermic Needle Array (Hypo-Rig). The 3D metal MEAs were packaged on multiple substrates, and a 3D insulation layer was defined to fabricate microelectrodes that were subsequently characterized mechanically and electrically.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Rajaraman, Swaminathan

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Graduate Studies

Department

Nanoscience Technology Center

Degree Program

Nanotechnology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008081; DP0023220

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0023220

Language

English

Release Date

February 2023

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Campus-only Access)

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