Abstract

This study examined why some low-income families in the Central Florida area made particular school choices for their children. Specifically, this study aimed to understand why families living in poverty selected their zoned public school as their first choice as an educational pathway for their children. This study is significant because understanding how and why families make school choices allows educational stakeholders to provide more equitable circumstances for students and families living in poverty. Qualitative data collection methods revealed that families recognized the advantages and disadvantages of their choices, but ultimately selected a zoned public school for their children as the best option. A primary finding from this study revealed that families valued teachers over any other resource available in the school. This study is unique because families living in poverty are often under-represented in studies involving school choice. Recommendations that could improve upon this study may include the involvement of more participants from different regions.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu.

Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Biraimah, Karen

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

Learning Sciences and Educational Research

Degree Program

Curriculum and Instruction

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008845

Language

English

Release Date

December 2026

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

Share

COinS