Abstract

Nickel-base superalloys are ideal materials for application in high temperature and high stress environments. Their resistance to both heat and corrosion makes these metals well-suited for use as components in engines and turbines. There has been much interest in characterizing the mechanical properties of Ni-base superalloys under severe conditions. Either large monotonic loads or cyclic loads are the most investigated. Also, research efforts tend to focus on the influence of microstructural features of fatigue life, and they accomplish this through qualitative observation. Presented here is both quantitative and qualitative analysis done on Ni-base superalloy specimens that have been subjected to multiple types and degrees of tensile and fatigue loading. The quantitative fracture features referred to as the fracture length deviation and surface roughness are the focus of the analysis. The method of quantifying these features is a focal point of this work and is described in detail with the intention that others will be able to apply it in future research. The research presented here also catalogues an extensive collection of microscopic-level images obtained with a specific optical microscope that allows a topographical view to be taken of the fracture surface. This type of analysis allows comparisons to be drawn across multiple samples of both the directionally solidified and the single crystal variety of the superalloy, in addition to distinguishing the different effects of the material orientation.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2022

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Gordon, Ali

Degree

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Mechanical Engineering; Mechanical Systems

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008969; DP0026302

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0026302

Language

English

Release Date

May 2022

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2022; it will then be open access.

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