Keywords

Transgender, Hypervigilance, Fatigue, Minority Stress Theory, Medical Providers

Abstract

This thesis uses the limited research on LGBTQ+ specific hypervigilance and queer battle fatigue to explore the prevalence of hypervigilance and fatigue in trans+ medical experiences, even when emotions aren't centered in their narratives, while also using participants' narratives and minority stress theory to suggest changes to the American medical system. Data was taken from a previous study of in-depth interviews on healthcare experiences of 60 trans+ young adults ages 18-24. Analysis of the data was done in NVivo using line-by-line coding for mentions of emotional responses linked to hypervigilance within interview transcripts. Results show that 67% of participants shared fears about their medical care. The main themes revolved around being outed by medical providers to unsupportive parents, along with avoiding medical help out of fear of being mistreated by the provider and/or staff. Participants also shared frustration with having to educate medical providers and others in positions of power about their care or even having to go so far as to “reenter the closet” to ease through interactions. 58% of participants reported feeling anxiety and fatigue around their healthcare visits. The implications of this thesis are that the scholarship on trans+ hypervigilance applies to experiences when not asked about hypervigilance but also suggests adding ‘frustration' to transgender hypervigilance categories. Secondly, queer battle fatigue applies to systems outside of education, in this case, healthcare. Finally, the findings from this study further corroborate that the current medical systems can negatively impact trans+ patients and propose ways to de-center cisnormativity from healthcare.

Completion Date

2024

Semester

Spring

Committee Chair

Carter, Shannon

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Sociology

Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Rights

In copyright

Release Date

May 2024

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Campus Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Accessibility Status

Meets minimum standards for ETDs/HUTs

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