Abstract

In the United States (US), lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals are at an increased risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections, are less likely to receive recommended health screenings, are more likely to abuse alcohol and other substances, are at a higher risk for attempting suicide, and experience greater health disparities compared to their heterosexual counterparts. Compounding these health-related problems is a significant discrepancy whereby LGBTQ people have poor or no access to health care. One approach to correct the health disparities the LGBTQ community faces is through LGBTQ-specific health education for nursing students. A review of the literature revealed undergraduate-level nursing programs should employ competent faculty, incorporate increased instruction time, use updated textbooks, assign projects or entire modules specific to the health care needs of LGBTQ patients, employ simulations when available, and incorporate LGBTQ topics throughout the undergraduate nursing curriculum. These changes have the potential to make a positive impact on improving health care for LGBTQ patients in the US.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Summer

Thesis Chair

Blackwell, Christopher

Degree

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)

College

College of Nursing

Department

Nursing

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

8-1-2021

Included in

Nursing Commons

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