Abstract

The overall goal of this project was to develop, optimize, and test an ultrasound-responsive targeted nanobubble for delivering osteoporosis-related silencing genes such as Cathepsin K small interfering RNA (CTSK siRNA) for osteoporosis treatment. The nanobubbles were synthesized using an in situ sonochemical method. The nanobubble (NB) is composed of a gas core made from perfluorocarbon, stabilized with albumin, encapsulated with CTSK siRNA, and embedded with alendronate (AL) for bone targeting (CTSK siRNA-NB-AL). Following its development, the responsiveness of CTSK siRNA-NB-AL to a therapeutic ultrasound probe was examined. The results of biocompatibility tests with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells proved no significant cell death (p > 0.05). When the CTSK siRNA-NB-AL was supplemented with human osteoclast precursors, they suppressed osteoclastogenesis. Thus, this project establishes the potential of nanotechnology and ultrasound to deliver genes into the osteoclasts. This research also presents a novel ultrasound responsive and targeted nanobubble platform that can be used as a gene, drug, and/or oxygen delivery system for various diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, or bone disorders.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Self, William

Co-Chair

Razavi, Mehdi

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Medicine

Department

Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Release Date

11-1-2022

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