Abstract

This thesis analyzes the impact of the Evangelical movement on politics in Latin America, through case studies on of revolutionary leftist Hugo Chávez in Venezuela and far right Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil. Both the Chávez and Bolsonaro political machineries reached out to the Evangelical movement and aligned themselves with new social and political actors associated with this movement. Though these two leaders promised very different programs, they both successfully sought the support of leaders and members of the Evangelical movement. The contradictory context of these two cases in terms of political platforms, their shared association with the Evangelical church, generates a puzzle of similar religious organizations supporting vastly dissimilar political movements. This thesis uses a process tracing methodology to address this puzzling alignment of conservative religious organizations with both ultra conservative and revolutionary leftist political parties in the two countries.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Fall

Thesis Chair

Wilson, Bruce

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

School of Politics, Security, and International Affairs

Degree Program

International and Global Studies

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

12-1-2021

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