Abstract

Discrimination manifests itself in an unending variety of forms and can be observed in nearly every society the world has seen up to the present. What is often overlooked, however, are the ways in which discriminatory behaviors form as a result of complex history and cultural relations. This is no less clear than it is with the case of the Dominican Republic and Haiti, two countries that share a small island in the Caribbean. This thesis places its focus in breaking down the complex history and attitudes that have, in turn, led to the creation and espousing of antihaitianismo in Dominican political policy. From here, historical accounts, cultural analyses, and statistical breakdowns will be utilized in unison to work towards providing a better understanding as to how a particularly authoritarian period in Dominican history worsened living conditions for Haitians in the country. Ruthless governance combined with antagonistic laws and incentives will be inspected and studied alongside existing data to better understand how conditions currently stand for those of Haitian descent living in the Dominican Republic.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Fall

Thesis Chair

Sousa, Sandra

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

School of Politics, Security & International Affairs

Degree Program

International and Global Studies

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

12-1-2021

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