Abstract

Global crises are associated with significant shifts in the relationship functioning of romantic couples. The novel Coronavirus pandemic has caused financial distress which may pose a threat to the wellbeing of romantic couples. Previous studies show economic declines cause damaging strain on relationship functioning, specifically the relationship satisfaction, conflict resolution, and commitment influencing variables. To study the effects of the pandemic on these relationship functioning variables, researchers recruited and divided 228 participants into two groups – individuals in relationships that began before the outbreak of the COVID pandemic (Before January 2020 – pre-COVID; N= 148), and individuals in relationships that started after the initial wave of the pandemic (After March 2020 – post-COVID; N= 80). Our results show a significant association between economic strain and conflict resolution. This finding suggests that circumstances that induce financial strain – similar to the COVID-related economic declines – may be linked to the deterioration of couples' abilities to solve conflicts. Although there were no significant differences in the relationship functioning variables of individuals in relationships that began prior to the pandemic in comparison to individuals in relationships that began while the pandemic was underway, findings suggest that future analyses may lead to significant results.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Fall

Thesis Chair

White, Grace

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

12-1-2021

Included in

Psychology Commons

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