Abstract

As nations economically prosper, do future generations undergo a steady shift in values? This thesis seeks to analyze the Post-World War II intergenerational shift in Japanese attitudes toward Japanese women and the LGBT, multiethnic, and indigenous communities. Centered around Ronald Inglehart's "Materialist" and "Post-Materialist" theories, this research seeks to contribute to current literature surrounding the development of contemporary Japanese values. Inglehart's "Materialist" theory consists of the idea that individuals pursued various goals in hierarchical order with their base necessities such as sustenance and safety gaining priority. After their base necessities are satisfied, Inglehart believed that people's values shifted, emphasizing belonging, self-expression, and quality of life, all considered "Post-Materialist" values. This thesis utilizes empirical data and qualitative materials to analyze the shift in Japanese views surrounding gender, sexual, and ethnic minorities. This thesis found that Inglehart’s Post-Materialist value change and intergenerational shift were present in views toward women and the LGBT community while views toward the Hafu and Ainu may be backsliding.

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Kim, Myunghee

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

School of Politics, Security, and International Affairs

Degree Program

International and Global Studies

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2022

Restricted to the UCF community until 5-1-2022; it will then be open access.

Included in

Asian Studies Commons

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