Abstract

Unsatisfactory results for the aim of reducing suicide rates have motivated the creation of new models to predict suicide, such as the ideation-to-action framework, which focuses on differentiating those with suicidal ideation and those who attempt suicide. The most recently published theory on the ideation-to-action framework is the Three-Step Theory (3ST). Step 1 proposes that the combination of pain and hopelessness causes suicidal ideation, step 2 proposes that ideation increases when pain and hopelessness surpass connectedness, and step 3 proposes that strong suicidal ideation escalates to action when the person has the capacity to attempt suicide. The theory’s concepts are intentionally conceptualized very broadly. The current study aims to compare the traditional conceptualization measurements of the Three-Step Theory with a broader range of predictors. We aim to test the first two steps of the theory through a mediation model and examine if connectedness serves as a mediator in the relationship between psychological pain and hopelessness in predicting the severity of suicidal ideation. We hypothesized that adding a broader conceptualization of pain (i.e., physical pain) and connectedness (i.e., perceived meaning of life, social pleasure, affective empathy) will better account for the level of suicidal ideation. We also hypothesized that connectedness serves as a mediator in the relationship between psychological pain and hopelessness in predicting suicide ideation severity. Following exclusions and removing missing data, 97 participants were available for analysis. Results showed that one of our novel measurements of connectedness, perceived burdensomeness, mediated the relationship between psychological pain and suicidal ideation severity.

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Bedwell, Jeffrey S.

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2022

Restricted to the UCF community until 5-1-2022; it will then be open access.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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