Abstract

The United States healthcare system cares for and supports a diverse patient population. Patients come from various ethnic backgrounds, speak different languages, hold distinct religious affiliations, and more. These differences can create a chasm in the patient-provider relationship, impacting the quality of care or health outcomes. Specifically, language-discordance can affect patient-provider communication; however, technological interventions, such as access to electronic medical record tools and digital translators, can facilitate this dyadic communication. This scoping review examines the literature present on the use of digital tools to facilitate multilingual patient-provider communication. The initial search in PubMed with MeSH terms resulted in 531 studies. After studies were screened for the inclusion criteria in abstract and full-text screening, seven studies remained for data extraction. Results revealed no strong patterns regarding either type of digital technology studied, medical specialization, or clinical setting. Only one randomized controlled trial was identified. Findings highlight the need for more research in this field to determine more specific impact of the usage of technology in healthcare communication.

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Miller, Ann

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Medicine

Department

Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences

Degree Program

Biomedical Sciences

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2022

Restricted to the UCF community until 5-1-2022; it will then be open access.

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