Abstract

Hispanic/Latinx are the largest growing population in the U.S. Moreover, discrimination has been researched as a sociocultural factor that contributes to alcohol use in ethnic minorities. This study examines whether discrimination is related to drinking status among Hispanic/Latinx college students. To better understand ethnic disparities, acculturation is considered at high and low levels, as well as sex differences. 283 college students that identified as Hispanic/Latinx completed the survey. After answering demographic information, participants self-reported their alcohol use (AUDIT), discrimination experiences (EDS), and acculturation (SMAS). For females, the analysis indicated that there was a significant positive relationship between discrimination and problem drinking at high levels of acculturation (B = 1.56, p =.003), but not low levels (B = 0.36, p =.490). For males, the opposite was observed. At low levels of acculturation, there was a modest relationship between discrimination and problem drinking (B = 1.30, p =.064). This research adds to the literature on acculturation’s impact on problem drinking and discrimination, and sex differences concerning acculturation. Furthermore, it may inform intervention, suggesting that discrimination should be targeted to help ease the burden on alcohol use. Lastly, this research furthers research on the impact of acculturation on Hispanic/Latinx.

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Dvorak, Robert

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Release Date

5-1-2027

Restricted to the UCF community until 5-1-2027; it will then be open access.

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