Abstract

The first Black American president ran for re-election in the 2012 election, which saw record-breaking voter turnout. After this election, scholars sought to examine what social identities impacted voter turnout and, found that non-Hispanic Black voters played a critical role in shaping President Obama’s success. Although the effects of social identities on voter turnout are the focus of an extensive body of existing research, many scholars study the separate effects of characteristics, such as race/ethnicity, gender or party identification. Utilizing public opinion data from the 2016 General Survey Study (GSS), this paper seeks to examine the intersectional effects of race, ethnicity, and gender on voter turnout in the 2012 Presidential Election. The findings of this can assist in understanding the impact these social identities had on turnout for non-Hispanic Black women in the 2012 presidential election and provide a basis for studying these intersecting factors in succeeding elections.

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Wright, Kenicia

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Undergraduate Studies

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Release Date

5-1-2023

Restricted to the UCF community until 5-1-2023; it will then be open access.

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