Abstract

Current secondary theatre education in America places a priority on Western ideals of theatre history and practices. Latine theatre history is hardly taught, and if it is, it is touched minimally. Latine culture places an emphasis on a collective, both in theoretical and practical work. Similarly, the practice of dramaturgy itself is rarely mentioned in curriculums, rather intertwined within lessons of acting, directing, and design. This creates an imbalance in practice versus theory in theatre education. I intend to introduce the concept of collaborative dramaturgy: a form of dramaturgy where students collaborate as dramaturgs to bring about discussions about identity. I believe it is important that Latine students are exposed not only to seeing Latine creatives represented on stage but as well as in their curriculum. In this thesis, I will explore the following questions: How does collaborative dramaturgy fit in a Latine classroom? How does a focus on physicality and text aid Latine theatre education? How does Latine representation work in a non-Latine text?

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Horn, Elizabeth

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Theatre

Degree Program

Theatre Studies

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2022

Restricted to the UCF community until 5-1-2022; it will then be open access.

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