Abstract

Suicide is a growing public health problem, and the 12th leading cause of death overall in the United States. Past research has been conducted on individuals who screen positive for suicide to determine risk factors and suicide patterns across age groups. However, limited little research has been conducted on individuals that screen positive for suicide risk in an emergency department setting. Through the use of a longitudinal, secondary dataset from the Florida Implementation of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention Project, the relationship between alcohol and drug use and generation (Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials), age, and living status was analyzed in adults (25+) who screened positive for suicide risk in the emergency department. Omnibus chi-square statistics and adjusted standardized residual analyses were used to assess differences in alcohol and drug use amongst generations, age groups, and living statuses. Results indicated significant differences between alcohol, opioid, and amphetamine use and frequency among individuals living with family and in unsheltered environments and marijuana use in Generation X and Millennials. Limitations include sample size and self-reported measures of frequency and usage of drugs and alcohol, which warrant future studies to expand upon these findings.

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Gryglewicz, Kim

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Release Date

5-1-2027

Restricted to the UCF community until 5-1-2027; it will then be open access.

Share

COinS