Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between personality and pain perception in healthy adults. Thirty participants completed the study. All participants were asked to scan a QR code and fill out a survey on their phones that included demographic questions and the Eysenck personality inventory (EPI). The demographics section included questions on age, sex, job activity level, and physical activity level. The researcher then evaluated their pressure pain threshold (PPT) using a handheld pressure algometer. The algometer was applied to the regions of the right paravertebral (PVM), quadratus lumborum (QL), and piriformis (PF) muscles perpendicular to the skin based on standardized palpation procedures. The participants were instructed to report when the sensation changed from “comfortable” to “mildly unpleasant pressure.” Results suggest that there was a positive correlation between PPT applied to the different muscles but there was no strong correlation found between the participants extraversion score and neuroticism score and their PPT at different muscles. This study aids in the understanding of the relationship between personality and pain sensitivity by providing a better view on which tools are the most beneficial in assessing personality and how it relates to pain in a clinical setting.

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Summer

Thesis Chair

Hanney, William

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Health Professions and Sciences

Department

Kinesiology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

8-15-2022

Restricted to the UCF community until 8-15-2022; it will then be open access.

Included in

Kinesiology Commons

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