Abstract

September 20th, 2017 was a devastating day for many Puerto Ricans as Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico. A majority of people were left without electricity, water, transportation, and communication between friends and family. In addition, many experienced losses such as destruction of their home and personal belongings as well as the death of family members and friends. This resulted in a decline in mental health. According to previous literature, key indicators of poor mental health in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria were increased diagnoses of depression, anxiety, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This study provides a comprehensive literature review that examines differences in mental health and trauma between those who, after Hurricane Maria, migrated to Florida compared to those that remained in Puerto Rico. I also used interviews from a previous study and various newspaper articles to answer my research question. Preliminary findings suggest that trauma and anxiety have been identified in both groups. Finally, I was able to interview a mental health counselor from Puerto Rico via Zoom. Findings from the literature review and other data sources explored several contextual differences related to mental health including trauma, PTSD, resilience, depression, anxiety, as well as medical and psychological needs.

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Summer

Thesis Chair/Advisor

Rivera, Fernando

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Sociology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

8-15-2022

Restricted to the UCF community until 8-15-2022; it will then be open access.

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