Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between childhood maltreatment and social networking addiction to determine if it was mediated by anxious-avoidant attachment. It was hypothesized that the presence of an anxious-avoidant attachment pattern developed as a result of childhood maltreatment would mediate the correlation between anxious-avoidant attachment and social networking addiction. This would mean that participants who developed an anxious-avoidant attachment style due to childhood maltreatment would use social media in unhealthy ways. To measure childhood maltreatment, the Adverse Childhood Experiences scale (ACE) was used. The Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised scale (ECR-R) was used to measure anxious-avoidant attachment. Finally, social networking addiction was measured by the Social Networking Addiction Scale (SNAS). The sample was relatively young (M = 19.88, SD = 2.62), (n = 82). Three bivariate correlations and multiple linear regression were conducted to determine if an anxious-avoidant attachment pattern mediated the connection between childhood maltreatment and social networking addiction. A significant correlation was found between childhood maltreatment and anxious-avoidant attachment, as well as between anxious-avoidant attachment and social networking addiction. However, no correlation was found between childhood maltreatment and social networking addiction. It was concluded that no mediation was present.

Thesis Completion

2022

Semester

Summer

Thesis Chair

Chesnut, Jason

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

8-15-2022

Restricted to the UCF community until 8-15-2022; it will then be open access.

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