Abstract

This thesis aims to explore and evaluate the traumatic space of Denver in Toni Morrison's Beloved. Currently, a lack of critical discourse exists to link together Denver, trauma, and theories of spatiality. This thesis evaluates three types of trauma that inform and develop Denver's traumatic space: direct, indirect, and insidious trauma. Paired with spatial theories, the origins of Denver's trauma are mapped throughout the various places of the novel. The result of this analysis reveals a complex and layered traumatic space, with lasting ramifications on Denver's sense of safety, identity, and stability in a post-slavery United States.

Thesis Completion

2019

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Angley, Patricia

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

English

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Release Date

5-1-2022

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