Abstract

Substance abuse is a global problem that has contributed to a variety of societal, financial, health, and familial strains. An increasing prevalence of illicit drug, prescription opioids, and alcohol abuse has created a need for re-evaluation of recovery and relapse treatments. This literature review examines the efficacy of meditation-based treatments for relapse prevention in persons recovering from Substance Use Disorders (SUDs). A comparative analysis of Mindfulness Based Relapse Programs (MBRP), an adapted MBRP-W program, and a Transcendental Meditation (TM) intervention was used to examine the success of meditation-based interventions. Research supports improvements associated with the meditation-based interventions including significant reductions in substance use, craving, stress, and negative affect. Meditation-based therapy may provide the emotional self-regulation and decreased impulsivity required for long-term abstinence from substance use. Consistent meditative practice was associated with greater improvements. Altering current meditation-based therapy treatment programs to encourage adherence and participation may increase success. Additional research is needed to evaluate long-term relapse prevention potential. Research incorporating meditation-based supportive therapies that promote well-being, emotion regulation, and stress relief are important for the future of successful SUD treatment.

Thesis Completion

2019

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Burr, Joyce

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Nursing

Department

Nursing

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2019

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