Abstract

The relationship between self-objectification, grooming behaviors, and body image disturbance was examined among 389 female students at the University of Central Florida. Self-objectification positively predicted body image disturbance, as well as the average amount of time and money that women reported investing into grooming behaviors (i.e. hair-styling, hair-removal, makeup application, nail adornment and other grooming behaviors). Body mass index (BMI) was also found to positively predict body image disturbance and time spent on grooming, however, no relationship was found between self-objectification and BMI. Furthermore, lower socioeconomic status (SES) was found to be associated with body-dissatisfaction and more frequent negative body image emotions in comparison to participants with higher SES. A significant negative correlation was also found between time spent on grooming and grade point average (GPA).

Thesis Completion

2019

Semester

Summer

Thesis Chair

Brophy-Ellison, James

Co-Chair

White, Grace

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Release Date

8-1-2024

Share

COinS