Abstract

This study examines the potential predictors of the sexual double standard and how attitudes relate to sexual behaviors. A sample of 138 undergraduates (N = 138; 77% female; 23% male; ages 18-57; M = 24, SD = 6.05) at the University of Central Florida were asked in Fall, 2019 to complete four questionnaires measuring sex-type roles, sexual scripts, and ambivalent sexist attitudes. Results showed that female participants who had lower ambivalent sexist views reported to having more sexual partners. Male participants were found to endorse sex-type roles and hostile sexism more than female participants, but were not significantly different from each other. Across the sample, participants indicated that seventeen was the ideal amount of lifetime sexual partners for men and women. Although the presence of the sexual double standard was not detected, findings suggest that traditional attitudes and gendered beliefs may play a role in sexual behaviors.

Thesis Completion

2019

Semester

Fall

Thesis Chair

Hubertz, Martha

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Release Date

12-1-2024

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