Abstract

The purpose of this thesis was to investigate new possible compounds that can be used to treat orthopedic implant infections caused by bacterial pathogens. Current treatment includes the use of antibiotics and the DAIR procedure, which stands for debridement, antibiotic therapy, irrigation, and retention. However, antibiotics are becoming less effective as a treatment due to bacteria gaining antibiotic resistance. Two bacterial species involved in orthopedic implant infections are P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. This thesis investigated cerium oxide nanoparticles and L. fermentum, a beneficial bacterium, as possible treatments to stop bacterial growth and the formation of biofilm. This was done by using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method with P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. An XTT assay, a viability assay, was also performed on RAW macrophages to determine how these compounds affect human immune cells. Dextran-coated, 50/50, and 70/30 Ce4+/Ce3+ CNP (cerium oxide nanoparticles) at 1, 10, 20, 100, 500, and 800 µg/mL were investigated. These kinds of CNP were investigated to determine which type of CNP and at what concentration was most effective. The results show significant reductions (p-value ≤ 0.05) in infection totals for various treatments, such as 10 µg/mL 50/50 CNP (cerium oxide nanoparticles). This study adds to the field of research in investigating new treatments for orthopedic implant infections.

Thesis Completion

2020

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Coathup, Melanie

Co-Chair

Rohde, Kyle

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Medicine

Department

Biomedical Sciences

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2020

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