Abstract

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective tool for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition in sexually active at-risk individuals such as men who have sex with men (MSM). The purpose of this study is to examine factors associated with intent to engage in risky sexual behavior among HIV-negative college aged (18-24) MSM who are currently adherent to PrEP or who have expressed interest in the future adoption of PrEP. A multiracial/ethnic sample of 31 men expressing interest in the adoption of PrEP and 6 men currently taking PrEP completed a quantitative survey identifying key themes regarding attitudes towards PrEP and potential behaviors associated with adherence. Themes associated with current adherence to PrEP included protection from HIV infection, the opportunity to engage in sexual activities with a non-condom HIV prevention method, and perceived protection from sexually transmitted infections. Themes associated with potential adoption of PrEP included protection from HIV infection, opportunity to engage in sexual activity with known HIV-positive partners, opportunity to engage in sexual activities with a non-condom HIV prevention method, and perceived protection from sexually transmitted infections. Review found that decreased condom use and increased sexual partners are key themes related to initiation of PrEP, and a decrease in frequency of condom use was indicated among the adherent sample. Other key themes identified include barriers to PrEP implementation and misinformation regarding sexually transmitted infections among the population.

Thesis Completion

2020

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Cook, Christa

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Nursing

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2020

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