Abstract

This study investigates the role that family communication patterns may play in predicting student experiences by looking at the experiences of native United States and international college students. Experiences in college are shaped by various factors including self-efficacy, stress, loneliness and depression. Data were collected from a sample of 152 students – 90 being U.S. natives studying at UCF and 62 being international students studying at UCF. Results indicated that conversation orientation, or a more open-conversation household, was positively linked with higher academic self-efficacy and negatively linked with stress, mainly for U.S. students. Conformity orientation, or a less open-conversation household, was positively correlated with loneliness and depression for both U.S. and international students.

Thesis Completion

2020

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Weger, Harry

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Communication

Degree Program

Human Communication

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2020

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