Abstract

The purpose of this thesis is to take a more profound and nuanced look into the effects of diversity in transmedia storytelling (also known as transmedia narrative or multiplatform storytelling) on society, more specifically, how the representation in these stories affect the minority groups that interact with transmedia. This thesis investigates the depiction of minority groups in transmedia storytelling and the influence of identifiable characters and plotlines. The research and following interviews I have engaged in will encapsulate into a screenplay set in a fictional court that offers the discourse of "forced diversity" within the transmedia narrative: whether or not this exists and is necessary for the success of telling a story across multiple platforms.

By exploring the human condition in both the documentary and the screenplay, I conclude in a critical reflection accompanying the creative works that the inclusion of minorities in transmedia is vital to its success. When creators include minorities in transmedia, audiences can draw connections that are more personal to them; they can participate in the symbolic "hero's journey" with the character in the story. By further diversifying transmedia works, intellectual properties' appeal is widened to a broader audience, allowing for potential success, both economically and socially, that transcends both domestic and international borders. I further conclude that failures with diversification efforts have detrimental socioeconomic consequences that could impact both transmedia and its audiences.

Thesis Completion

2020

Semester

Fall

Thesis Chair

Telep, Peter

Co-Chair

Grajeda, Anthony

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

English

Degree Program

Creative Writing

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

12-1-2020

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