Abstract

The relationship between monstrosity and homosexuality is complex, interwoven, and essential to 21st century understandings of horror and pop culture. Yet, not enough work has been done to disentangle these narratives. While the LGBT community has recently made tremendous strides in national acceptance and legalized marriage, queer individuals still feel like the monsters of both media and real life. This thesis seeks to explore the relationship between monstrosity and queerness, developing both a lens for understanding monstrosity, and understanding pop culture monsters through that lens. This thesis seeks to dismember these cultural narratives––much as these narratives have dismembered queer communities. By dismantling and reconstructing monstrosity through verse, this thesis hopes to shed light towards the struggles queer men (and non-fictional monsters) face.

Thesis Completion

2020

Semester

Fall

Thesis Chair

Hurt, Rochelle

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

English

Degree Program

Creative Writing

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Release Date

12-1-2025

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