Abstract

Problem-solving has been recognized as a critical skill that students lack in the current education system, due to the use of algorithmic questions in tests that can be simply memorized and solved without conceptual understanding. Research on student problem-solving is needed to gain deeper insight into how students are approaching problems and where they lack proficiency so that instruction can help students gain a conceptual understanding of chemistry. The MAtCH (methods, analogies, theory, context, how) model was recently developed from expert explanations of their research and could be a valuable model to identify key components of student problem-solving. This project will address the current gap in the literature of applying the MAtCH model to student responses by first adapting the original definitions of MAtCH to student problem-solving and then coding transcripts of students solving several open-ended problems using these new definitions. The results of this study will discuss in detail the revisions made to apply MAtCH definitions to student transcripts and give insight into the elements of promoted and impeded student problem-solving under the MAtCH model.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Randles, Christopher

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Chemistry

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2021

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