Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to examine how the media’s positive and negative portrayals related to racism impact the viewer’s attitudes regarding African Americans. Previous research has shown how misinformation in the media can implicitly affect one's level of racism. Previous research has also shown that gender and one's sociodemographic status can affect the way individuals perceive misinformation. This study aimed to address the relationship between misinformation depicting racist views directed toward African Americans and consumer’s attitudes toward African Americans. It was hypothesized that exposure to misinformation will have a significant impact on participants’ level of racism. A Series of linear regression analyses were conducted to determine how race, sex, social class, right-wing authoritarianism, religious involvement, political preference, and exposure to real and fake news combined predict the pro-black and anti-black views of participants. Results indicated that exposure to fake news did have a significant negative impact on a pro-black viewpoint. However, the results of the study indicated that real or fake news did not significantly impact anti-black views.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Wright, Chrysalis

Co-Chair

McConnell, Daniel

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2021

Share

COinS