Abstract

Acculturative stress, the stress that originates from adapting to a new culture, is investigated for its role in immigrant mental health. Prior research shows that acculturative stress is commonly associated with adverse mental health outcomes, but this relationship is not inevitable and depends upon many in-group and individual characteristics. This survey study intended to determine whether the relationship found in the literature exists among UCF undergraduate immigrants and whether new variables can play a role in this relationship. Valid and reliable scales were used to measure acculturative stress, mental health, social support, subjective wellbeing, bicultural integration, and cultural orientation. Inconsistent with predictions, immigrants and nonimmigrants were found to have a similar degree of mental health symptoms. Consistent with previous research, a positive correlation between acculturative stress and mental health symptoms was found. Results also show social support, bicultural integration, and acculturative stress to collectively predict immigrant mental health. Immigrant generation and undergraduate year-in-college were found to play a significant role in the relationships investigated. The application of this research in the context of mental health stigmatization and other immigrant phenomena is discussed. Limitations, possible future research, and clinical implications are also shared to address further gaps in the literature.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Ghiasinejad, Shahram

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology Track

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2021

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