Abstract

The current study aimed to examine possible relationships between cultural orientation and identity formation. Late adolescent college students (N = 480) completed an anonymous survey online. Measures included the Cultural Orientation Scale, the Ego Identity Process Questionnaire, and the Identity Distress Survey. Contrary to predictions, neither identity exploration nor identity distress were found to be related to cultural orientation. However, identity commitment was significantly correlated with both individualism and collectivism. Further, a ONEWAY ANOVA suggested differences between identity statuses. An LSD post-hoc analyses found that the two committed statuses, Achievement (high in identity commitment after extensive identity exploration) and Foreclosure (premature commitment without exploration) groups scored significantly higher than the two low commitment groups, Moratorium (high in exploration but not yet committed) and Diffusion (neither exploring nor committed). Although we did not find those with more extreme scores on either individualism or collectivism to be greater in identity distress or identity exploration, there were significant differences on identity commitment. Interestingly, those with extreme scores on individualism were less committed in their identity than those with lower individualism scores, whereas those with extreme scores on collectivism were more committed in their identity than those with lower collectivism scores.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Berman, Steven L.

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Clinical Track

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2021

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