Abstract

A plethora of extant research focuses on the positive outcomes of organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB). However, there has been a relatively recent shift of focus that sheds light on the changing parameters and workplace perceptions of what such behaviors entail, as well as their adverse outcomes. As organizations and their employees endure changes, work expectations have consequently changed through differing perceptions of job tasks that individuals feel required or obligated to do, even when it is not included in their formal job description. Such feelings point to the concept of citizenship pressure (CP), which this thesis further explores and adds to the relatively little, but growing, research on the construct. Specifically, this thesis explores the relationship between OCB and job-related affective well-being (JAW), and the impact of CP on that relationship. A survey study was conducted to test the hypothesized moderation of CP on the relationship between OCB and JAW. The participants included 59 individuals over the age of 18 who were employed part-time or full-time, either at the time of their participation or within the preceding six months. While the hypothesized model was not significant, supplemental analyses were run on variations of this model. The additional models provided some significant findings that may lead to viable paths for further research. Future research directions, limitations, and practical implications are included.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Horan, Kristin

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2021

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