Abstract

This research sought to test the notion that the non-cisgender population experiences an inordinate toll in regard to their mental well-being as a result of inaccurate or incomplete classification of their self-identified gender identity among US college students (N = 591). In accordance with the previous literature, the non-cisgender population experienced a significant increase of perceived experience of microaggressions and internalized symptoms. Contrary to expectations, there was no significance found for rates of identity distress. Previous literature did not reflect a significantly lower score of challenging the binary for Caucasians in relation to Hispanic and Asian ethnicities, as this research revealed. This research indicates that while non-cisgender persons do experience higher rates of perceived microaggressions and identity related concerns, there is a previously accounted for variance in ethnicity and cisgender identities (male and female).

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Berman, Steven L.

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2021

Included in

Psychology Commons

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