Recognition of facial expressions : / a treatment protocol for right hemisphere damaged patients

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of treatment in right hemisphere damaged subjects. The success or failure of this treatment is directly correlated to their ability to perform appropriate social skills. Two groups, control vs. experimental, were randomly selected, with each group consisting of 20 right hemisphere damaged subjects. It was hypothesized that the 20 subjects in the experimental group would show a significant improvement in naming the expressions and identifying same/different expressions on same/different faces after receiving treatment. Utilizing the exact same exam, both groups were tested before and after treatment within a two-week period. Based on statistical analysis, results indicated no significant difference between the control and experimental groups in response times or correctly naming the expression. Although the pre and post test difference between the two groups was insignificart, both groups showed improvement. The treatment group had a positive effect in identifying same/different expressions on same/different faces over the control group. The results of this study support experimental and clinical literature, which has indicated more difficulty with naming the express ion compared to identifying same/different express ions on same/different faces. These results suggest that right hemisphere damaged subjects will remain impaired ,n emotional perception. Further study to obtain more information regarding right hemisphere damaged subjects in actual social settings 1s recommended .

Notes

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Graduation Date

1991

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Mendenhall, Thomas S.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Department

Health Sciences

Format

PDF

Pages

47 p.

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Identifier

DP0028130

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Health and Public Affairs; Health and Public Affairs -- Dissertations, Academic

Accessibility Status

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