Abstract

Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 and other sulfate-reducing bacteria cause significant damage to metal pipelines and other infrastructure through a metabolic pathway that releases toxic hydrogen sulfide into their surroundings. The biocorrosion that results from the release of hydrogen sulfide creates significant economic burden, and can pose health risks for those exposed to this chemical. They are commonly present in the form of biofilms, an extracellular matrix composed of bacterial cells, polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, and other materials. These biofilms are difficult to remove, and they provide protection to the bacteria within from anti-bacterial treatments. Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 is a strain derived from a wild-type bacterium collected from an oil well corrosion site and is a model organism for understanding biofilm formation of sulfate-reducing bacteria and how these biofilms can be prevented or inhibited by techniques such as cerium oxide nanoparticle coating. To this end, samples of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 were grown anaerobically in 24-well and 96-well plates, and the resultant biofilm growth was measured through spectrophotometry. Several different environmental parameters were tested, including temperature, electron donor molecules, basal and enriched growth media, and oxidative stress, revealing several affinities for production of biofilm growth.

Thesis Completion

2017

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Self, William

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Medicine

Department

Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences

Degree Program

Biomedical Sciences

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

11-1-2017

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