Keywords

Academic Achievement, Leadership, Student Athletes, Social Issues, and Time Management

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation is to contribute to the body of knowledge in the area of effective time management skills among African American and Hispanic male student athletes and their academic achievement utilizing the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS: 2002) Base year thru the First follow-up database. The researcher has assessed indicators (socioeconomic status, time use patterns, sports participation, and race) within the construct of academic achievement among African American and Hispanic male high school student athletes. Their contribution to the main effects revealed that statistically significant differences exist between the non-sports participant and sports participant groups. After controlling for time spent completing mathematics homework and socioeconomic status, the findings revealed that time spent completing math homework was significantly related to academic achievement for African American and Hispanic male student athletes. Time spent watching television was not significantly related to academic achievement for African American and Hispanic male student athletes. For the variable time spent playing on the computer game, the analysis indicated that the detrimental effect of time spent playing video/computer games was the same for African American and Hispanic male student athletes. Finally, it is noteworthy that effective use of time (i.e., playing video games less) and sports participation positively influences academic achievement of African American and Hispanic males high school student athletes. Strategies were uncovered for possible future research among African American and Hispanic male student athletes to increase academic achievement levels.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Holt, Larry

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Studies

Degree Program

Curriculum and Instruction

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001580

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001580

Language

English

Release Date

May 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2007; it will then be open access.

Share

COinS