Abstract

This thesis investigates the turbulent flow features present in asymmetrical leading edge jet impingement and their effects from a fluid and heat transfer prospective using both numerical and experimental techniques. The jet-centerline plane flow field was quantified experimentally through the non-intrusive experimental method of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), while an area average heat transfer was acquired via a traditional copper block method. The numerical element served to investigate how well the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) k-? SST turbulence model predicts the flow field and heat transfer within the leading edge and further investigate the results outside of the experimental scope. Two different geometries, varied by H/d, were investigated at various Reynolds numbers ranging from 20,000 to 80,000. The geometry consisted of an array of 9 identical jets impinging on a leading edge of diameter D/d = 2, with an asymmetrical sidewall configuration to better represent the pressure side (PS) and suction side (SS) of a turbine blade. Several vortices were identified within the flow field of the leading edge geometry. These vortices were larger for the H/d = 4 configuration but did not contribute to any increased or decreased heat transfer compared to that of the H/d = 2.7 configuration. The most influential aspect to both the flow field and heat transfer was the change in crossflow velocity between the two geometries. The smaller cross sectional area of the H/d = 2.7 configuration saw an increase in crossflow velocity and jet bending, tending to also decrease the heat transfer. The numerical results also reflected these results and in both area averaged heat transfer and localized heat transfer contour plots.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2019

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Kapat, Jayanta

Degree

Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering (M.S.A.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Aerospace Engineering; Thermofluid Aerodynamic Systems

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007734

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007734

Language

English

Release Date

8-15-2019

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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