Abstract

In this research, I examine the pay equity dilemma women face around the world and how it is different in various regions of the world. My research question focuses on “how a nation’s cultural characteristics affect pay equity?” It is already documented that men are paid more than women. The goal of this study is to explain how individual characteristics of national culture (such as masculinity, individualism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance) impacts this inequality. By increasing the understanding of pay inequality, changes can be made that will improve the lives of not just women but the families of those women and the world overall. We use data from Geert Hofstede's national culture dimensions and the Global Gender Gap Report by the World Economic Forum. Our results suggest that gender gap reduces in low power distance cultures, in high individualistic cultures, in low masculine cultures, and in low uncertainty avoidance cultures. Our results provide evidence that the economic prosperity of women around the world is significantly impacted by cultural dimensions.

Thesis Completion

2018

Semester

Summer

Thesis Chair

Yayla-Kullu, Muge

Degree

Bachelor Science in Business Administration (B.S.B.A.)

College

College of Business Administration

Department

Marketing

Degree Program

Marketing

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

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