Abstract

Within the framework of ecological psychology, environments are places, defined as landscapes of affordances, or the array of potential actions that can be executed. The feedback between direct perception-action and use of affordances results in the sense of presence in place. According to previous research, increased presence has been correlated with greater attachment and connectedness with the place as well as beneficial psychological states in a campus setting. However, it is unclear what factors, such as demographics, may influence differences in engagement with campus affordances, and hence, presence among individuals. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between campus presence, demographic factors, and social self-concept. Participants completed a survey that assessed their demographics, aspects of self-concept, degree of campus engagement and their sense of presence on campus.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

McConnell, Daniel S.

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2021

Included in

Psychology Commons

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