Abstract

The present study explored student perceptions of instructor support in remote learning environments during the COVID-19 pandemic to better understand inequities in their learning experiences. Participants self-reported perceptions of instructor support, online learning experiences, mental health symptoms, and wellbeing. Bivariate correlation testing and linear regression modeling were used to analyze the data. Results indicate that students’ student-instructor rapport is associated with higher perception of instructor support. Further, higher perceptions of instructor support were associated with significantly lower symptoms of depression, anxiety, and academic-related stress. Higher degrees of students’ self-regulated learning behaviors were associated with lower perceived instructor support. There were no gender differences or differences based on first-generation student status in comfort asking instructors for academic support. These findings highlight the importance of developing teaching practices that promote comfort in course engagement, especially in those who report being not feeling comfortable enough to seek instructor support. While the COVID-19 pandemic is unlikely to continue disrupting our classrooms for much longer, we can use this time to better understand student experiences in remote learning environments to better suit their needs as this mode of teaching continues to be utilized in the future.

Thesis Completion

2021

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Woerner, Jacqueline

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2021

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